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Elizabeth A. Sackler papers

 Collection
Identifier: SSC-MS-00723

Scope and Contents

This collection documents Sackler's work to right the wrongs of cultural genocide perpetuated on American Indians, especially that of their most sacred objects and includes correspondence, reports, fundraising materials, A/V materials, photographs, and publications. Subsequent accession consists primarily of the Elizabeth A. Sackler Foundation correspondence with individuals and organizations.

Dates

  • 1962 - 2017

Creator

Conditions Governing Access

This collection is open for use with the following restrictions on access: The banner is not for public access.

Conditions Governing Access

Until we move into New Neilson in early 2021, collections are stored in multiple locations and may take up to 48 hours to retrieve. Researchers are strongly encouraged to contact Special Collections (specialcollections@smith.edu) at least a week in advance of any planned visits so that boxes may be retrieved for them in a timely manner.

Conditions Governing Use

To the extent that she owns copyright, Elizabeth A. Sackler has retained copyright, until her death, in her works donated to Smith College. Upon her death, copyright in these works will transfer to Smith College. Copyright in other items in this collection may be held by their respective creators. For reproductions of materials that are governed by fair use as defined under U. S. Copyright Law, no permission to cite or publish is required. For those few instances beyond fair use, or which may regard materials in the collection not created by Elizabeth A. Sackler, researchers are responsible for determining who may hold materials' copyrights and obtaining approval from them. Researchers do not need anything further from Smith College Special Collections to move forward with their use.

Biographical Note

Elizabeth A. Sackler, the daughter of Arthur M. Sackler, a psychiatrist who made a fortune in the pharmaceutical business and a noted patron of the arts, has been a tireless advocate on behalf of American Indians and the repatriation of their sacred objects as well as a self-described "matron"of feminist art". She has served as the CEO for her late father's foundation, The Arthur M. Sackler Foundation, since 1987. In 1992 Sackler founded and continues to serve as president of the American Indian Ritual Object Repatriation Foundation (AIRORF). Two years earlier a federal law was enacted to ensure this process and Sackler, long concerned about what she and others refer to as cultural genocide, seized the moment. Over the past two decades, AIRORF has overseen the return of countless sacred objects to their rightful owners, created a guide to the process ("Mending the Circle,"1996), produced a widely acclaimed documentary ("Life Spirit,"1993), and helped to educate the public in general re: the moral, ethical and legal debates on-going in the art market and museum collection worlds. In 2002, Sackler established a foundation in her own name with a very explicit purpose--to provide a permanent home to Judy Chicago's iconic installation,"The Dinner Party"(1974-1979). Thanks to Sackler's generosity and the cooperation of the Brooklyn Museum,"The Dinner Party"is the centerpiece of The Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art,"a home where the feminist principles of equality and justice reside."(http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/eascfa/about/benefactor_statement.php). In addition to"the Dinner Party,"the Center hosts traveling exhibits as well as sponsoring the Sackler Center First Awards, an annual event honoring extraordinary women who are first in their fields. The award, presented each year by Sackler and Gloria Steinem, was designed by Judy Chicago (http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/eascfa/video/first-awards). Sackler, who earned a PhD in 1997 from the Union Institute & University, Cincinnati, has published and spoken widely about the moral and ethical aspects of art collections. She is the recipient of numerous awards in honor of her endless advocacy on behalf of those who lack a voice. As Sackler herself has said,"I do not think of myself as a benefactor. I am a public historian, social and arts activist, and American Indian advocate and as such have found myself being conscious of the world around me and taking action in many ways."(http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/eascfa/about/benefactor_statement.php).

Extent

54 linear feet (55 containers, 7 posters)

0.03137 Gigabytes

Language of Materials

English

Overview

Elizabeth A. Sackler, the daughter of Arthur M. Sackler, a psychiatrist who made a fortune in the pharmaceutical business and a noted patron of the arts, has been a tireless advocate on behalf of American Indians and the repatriation of their sacred objects as well as a self-described "matron"of feminist art". Her papers include correspondence, reports, fundraising materials, A/V materials, photographs, and publications.

Arrangement

This collection has been added to over time in multiple "accessions." An accession is a group of materials received from the same source at approximately the same time. Note that in most cases, container numbers start over at 1 with each new accession.

Physical Characteristics and Technical Requirements

This collection contains materials received from the donor in digital form that are not currently available online. Please consult with Special Collections staff to request access to this digital content.

Other Finding Aids

One or more content listings to individual accessions in this collection are available for download. Links can be found in the description of the individual accessions.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Donated by Elizabeth A. Sackler, 2014.

Processing Information

The contents of computer media in this collection has been copied to networked storage for preservation and access; the original directory and file structure was retained and file lists were created.
Title
Finding aid to the Elizabeth A. Sackler papers
Status
Legacy Finding Aid (Updated)
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin

Revision Statements

  • 2017-07-26T17:48:24-04:00: This record was migrated from InMagic DB Textworks to ArchivesSpace.
  • 2019-03-14: Finding aid updated to current standards and published
  • 2020-05-29: Description added for born-digital content.

Repository Details

Part of the Sophia Smith Collection of Women's History Repository

Contact:
Young Library
4 Tyler Drive
Northampton MA 01063