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Florence Guertin Tuttle papers

 Collection
Identifier: SSC-MS-00163

Scope and Contents

The Florence Guertin Tuttle Papers include writings, speeches, research materials, and organizational records. Documents pertain to Tuttle's involvement in organizations such as the American Association for International Cooperation, the American Union Against Militarism, the Woman's Peace Party, and the League of Nations, among others, from the 1910s to the 1940s. Major themes include peace, internationalism, birth control rights, suffrage, women's clubs, and women writers. There is a small amount of biographical material, photographs, memorabilia, and family correspondence; and Tuttle's unpublished autobiography (1948). Notable correspondents include Virginia Gildersleeve, Florence Lamont, Anna Garlin Spencer, and Portia Willis (Berg) Fitzgerald.

Dates of Materials

  • 1917-1948

Creator

Language of Materials

English

Conditions Governing Access

The papers are open to research according to the regulations of the Sophia Smith Collection without any additional restrictions.

Conditions Governing Access

Until we move into New Neilson in early 2021, collections are stored in multiple locations and may take up to 48 hours to retrieve. Researchers are strongly encouraged to contact Special Collections (specialcollections@smith.edu) at least a week in advance of any planned visits so that boxes may be retrieved for them in a timely manner.

Conditions Governing Use

Copyright ownership of Florence Tuttle's writings is unknown. Copyright to materials authored by others may be owned by those individuals or their heirs or assigns. It is the responsibility of the researcher to identify and satisfy the holders of all copyrights. Permission to publish reproductions or quotations beyond "fair use" must also be obtained from the Sophia Smith Collection as owners of the physical property.

Biographical / Historical

Florence Guertin Tuttle was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1869 to Lucy Henry, a descendent of Patrick Henry, and Pierre Guertin, a merchant and French-Canadian immigrant. Educated at a small private school, the Nassau Institute, Guertin was an avid reader and a prolific writer of poems and stories. As a young adult, Guertin was involved in one of the first women's clubs, the Avitas Club, where she was exposed to speakers such as Charlotte Perkins Gilman. In her late twenties she married Frank Day Tuttle (Yale class of 1887) and the couple settled in Brooklyn Heights, New York. Their sons, Day and Guertin Tuttle, were born in 1902 and 1904. When the children were small, Tuttle devoted part of her time to many causes including women's suffrage, the Woman's Peace Party and birth control. In 1915 she published The Awakening of Woman: Suggestions from the Psychic Side of Feminism and in 1917 a collection of stories entitled Give My Love to Maria.

Devastated by the horrors of World War I, Tuttle became a strong advocate for internationalism. In this new role she became Chair of the Women's Pro-League Council in 1920 and attended numerous meetings of the Council of the League of Nations in Geneva. There she befriended many important people such as First Lady Edith Bolling Wilson and Carrie Chapman Catt. During this time she also wrote Women and World Federation (1919) as well as numerous articles and leaflets on world cooperation, economic causes of war, and the League of Nations. In 1932 she was selected by Carrie Chapman Catt to be a delegate to the Disarmament Conference in Geneva. Tuttle was in great demand as a speaker about peace and internationalism. She became the Executive Chairman of the Greater New York Branch of the League of Nations Non-Partisan Association in 1924 and published two more books, including Alternatives to War (1931) before her death in 1951.

Extent

8 boxes (3.5 linear feet)

Overview

The bulk of this collection consists of writings and speeches, research material, and records from Tuttle's involvement in organizations such as the American Association for International Cooperation, the American Union Against Militarism, the Women's Peace Party, and the League of Nations, among others, circa 1910s-1940s. Major themes include peace, internationalism, birth control rights, suffrage, women's clubs, and women writers. Significant correspondents include Virginia Gildersleeve, Florence Lamont, Anna Garlin Spencer, and Portia Willis (Berg) Fitzgerald. There is a small amount of biographical material, photographs, memorabilia, and family correspondence; and Tuttle's unpublished autobiography (1948).

Arrangement

This collection is organized into four series:
  1. BIOGRAPHICAL MATERIALS
  2. CORRESPONDENCE
  3. WRITINGS AND SPEECHES
  4. ORGANIZATIONS AND CONFERENCES
  5. OVERSIZE MATERIALS

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Frank Day Tuttle donated his mother's papers to the Sophia Smith Collection from 1951-62. Reprocessed by Kelsey Radwilowicz, 2007.
Title
Florence Guertin Tuttle papers
Subtitle
Finding Aid
Status
Completed
Author
Finding aid prepared by Kelsey Radwilowicz
Date
2008
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin

Revision Statements

  • 07/26/2017: This resource was modified by the ArchivesSpace Preprocessor developed by the Harvard Library (https://github.com/harvard-library/archivesspace-preprocessor)
  • 2017-07-26T17:48:15-04:00: This record was migrated from InMagic DB Textworks to ArchivesSpace.

Repository Details

Part of the Sophia Smith Collection of Women's History Repository

Contact:
Young Library
4 Tyler Drive
Northampton MA 01063