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Asian American women

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings
Scope Note: Identity categories provide another way of understanding the lives of women documented in our collections. Identities are assigned based on information available to the Smith College Special Collections, as declared by historical actors. Terms that people may have used to describe their own identities change over time. Because of this, not all collections are categorized. If we have made a mistake in our identity classification, please contact us.

Found in 4 Collections and/or Records:

Lora Jo Foo interviewed by Loretta J. Ross, December 16, 2006

 File — Box 18: [Barcode: 310183630031457]
Scope and Contents Foo describes a childhood in which gendered Chinese cultural norms combine with race and class discrimination to shape her emerging identity and educational options. She recounts theradicalizing effect of Asian American Studies in college and details her experiences in organizing immigrant women workers. Foo assesses the status of Asian American women’s organizations and reflects on the current state of progressive politics in the U.S. The interview concludes with a nod to the pleasure she...
Dates of Materials: December 16, 2006

Mary Chung Hayashi interviewed by Loretta J. Ross, December 15, 2006

 File — Box 25: [Barcode: 310183630031465]
Scope and Contents In this oral history Mary Chung Hayashi describes her childhood in South Korea and in the U.S. and discusses the circumstances that have led her to launch successive organizations addressing health issues in the Asian American community. She also discusses her path towards becoming the first Korean American elected to the California State Assembly. (Transcript 34 pp.)
Dates of Materials: December 15, 2006

Peggy Saika interviewed by Loretta Ross, February 20, 2006

 File — Box 49: [Barcode: 310183630031325]
Scope and Contents In this oral history, Saika underscores the lasting impact of the internment experience as a call to vigilance and action. She traces her political involvements from pan-Asian student activism in the late 1960s forward, marking her journey through various forms of organizing: direct service, civil rights, community organizing, and philanthropy. The interview offers a general outline of Saika's path as a postwar progressive who embraces her generation's challenge to build an ethnic movement that...
Dates of Materials: February 20, 2006

Setsuko (Suki) Terada Ports interviewed by Loretta J. Ross, January 5, 2008

 File — Box 41: [Barcode: 310183630031168]
Scope and Contents Ports recalls vivid stories of the impact of FBI surveillance of her family during World War II, including her mother's house arrest. She describes growing up in a Japanese American family in the postwar years. She details racial tensions in her personal life and public work, and comments on cultural norms and stereotypes that have influenced her ability to speak out. Ports summarizes her years of organizing around AIDS.(Transcript 91 pp.)
Dates of Materials: January 5, 2008